Beginnings

“A beginning is the time for taking the most delicate care that the balances are correct.”

It is spring. Time for planting new seeds. I started on a new job last week, and it seems that few of my friends and former colleagues are on their way to new adventures as well. I’m especially excited because I’m starting not just a new job – I will be working on a new product, far younger than Oracle and even MySQL. I am also making first tiny steps in the open-source community, something I’ve been looking to do for a while.

I’m itching to share lessons I’ve learned in my previous job, three challenging and rewarding years as a consultant. The time will arrive for those, but now is the time to share what I know about starting new jobs. Lessons that I need to recall, and that my friends who are also in the process of starting a new job may want to hear.

Say hello
I’m usually a very friendly person and after years of attending conferences I’m very comfortable talking to people I’ve never met before. But still, Cloudera has around 200 people in the bay area offices, which means that I had to say “Hello, I’m Gwen Shapira the new Solutions Architect, who are you?” around 200 times. This is not the most comfortable feeling in the world. Its important to go through the majority of the introductions in the first week or two, later on it becomes a bit more awkward. So in the first week it will certainly seem like you are doing nothing except meeting people, chatting a bit and franctically memorizing names and faces. This is perfectly OK.

Get comfortable being unproductive
The first week in a new job feels remarkably unproductive. This is normal. I’m getting to know people, processes, culture, about 20 new products and 40 new APIs. I have incredibly high expectations of myself, and naturaly I’m not as fast installing Hadoop cluster as I am installing RAC cluster. It takes me far longer to write Python code than it does to write SQL. My expectations create a lot of pressure, I internally yell at myself for taking an hour or so to load data into Hive when it “should” have taken 5 minutes. But of course, I don’t know how long it “should” take, I did it very few times before. I’m learning and while learning has its own pace, it is an investment and therefore productive.

Have lunch, share drinks
The best way to learn about culture is from people, and the best way to learn about products is from the developers who wrote them and are passionate about how they are used. Conversations at lunch time are better than tackling people in the corridor or interrupting them at their desk. Inviting people for drinks are also a great way to learn about a product. Going to someones cube and asking for an in-depth explanation of Hive architecture can be seen as entitled and bothersome. Sending email to the internal Hive mailing list and saying “I’ll buy beer to anyone who can explain Hive architecture to me” will result in a fun evening.

If its not overwhelming, you may be in the wrong job
I’m overwhelmed right now. So many new things to learn. First there are the Hadoop ecosystem products, I know some but far from all of them, and I feel that I need to learn everything in days. Then there is programming. I can code, but I’m not and never have been a proficient programmer. My colleagues are sending out patches left and right. It also seems like everyone around me is a machine learning expert. When did they learn all this? I feel like I will never catch up.

And that is exactly how I like it.

Make as many mistakes as possible
You can learn faster by doing, and you can do faster if you are not afraid of failing and making mistakes. Mistakes are more understandable and forgivable when you are new. I suggest using this window of opportunity and accelerate your learning by trying to do as much as possible. When you make a mistake smile and say “Sorry about that. I’m still new. Now I know what I should and shouldn’t do”

Take notes
When you are new a lot of things will look stupid. Sometimes just because they are very different from the way you are used to things in a previous job. Don’t give in to the temptation to criticise everything, because you will look like a whiner. No one likes whiner. But take note of them, because you will get used to them soon and never see things with “beginner mind” again. In few month take a look at your list, if things still look stupid, it will be time to take on a project or two to fix them.

Contribute
I may be new at this specific job, but I still have a lot to contribute. I try hard to look for opportunities and I keep finding out that I’m more useful than I thought. I participate in discussions in internal mailing lists, I make suggestions, I help colleagues solve problems. I participate in interviews and file tickets when our products don’t work as expected. I don’t wait to be handed work or to be sent to a customer, I look for places where I can be of use.

I don’t change jobs often. So its quite possible that I don’t know everything there is to know about starting a new job. If you have tips and suggestions to share with me and my readers, please comment!

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4 Comments on “Beginnings”

  1. Good luck for your new job and your new blog ! now I understand why you renamed it :)

  2. Satish says:

    Good Luck . Hope to see lot of Hadoop DBA write ups from you. If you would like to learn about machine learning , there is a course from Prof NG Andrew @stanford in http://www.coursera.org. Currently the course is on.

  3. dbbulletin says:

    Hi Gwen – Good luck in your new gig. I’m a long time reader and fan of your prodlife and pythian blog postings. You helped educate me on NoSQL so I can’t wait to see what you write as you switch your focus to that arena. I myself am starting a new job in the big data space at a company called Rainstor, I feel privileged to be working in the same sector as you!
    Best regards,
    Ben Weiss


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